This January, we saw the results of a leader trying to raise doubt in a free and fair election process. But even after he’s left office, we’re seeing the long-lasting effects of those doubts, which have now leaked into the GOP’s platform.

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In a speech on Friday, grandstanding Florida governor Ron DeSantis said that he wants to improve Florida’s election system by increasing transparency, strengthening election security, and improving voter confidence in the system. To do this, he proposed two measures: restricting access to ballot drop-off boxes and banning universal mail-in balloting. DeSantis said this in his speech on Friday:

“We want, obviously, everyone to vote. But we don’t want anyone to cheat. And we want to make sure that we strike that appropriate balance” — Ron DeSantis

Before I illustrate the irrationality of these measures, I’d like to make one thing…


Joe Biden’s coronavirus bill is ambitious. Apart from trying to garner the support of a number of Republicans, his administration faces the daunting task of finding almost two trillion dollars to spend in the middle of a recession. How does he plan to do that?

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Although the bill is by no means final and is likely to change given the President’s insistence on bipartisan consensus, at least to an extent, his coronavirus legislation, as it stands now, attempts to institute a fifteen dollar minimum wage for federal workers, send out relief aid to those in need, and help improve the…


Our congressional system is built for gridlock: bills have to pass through a million steps to get passed and lawmakers are constantly worrying about their chances at re-election. But what if they weren’t?

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I think one thing is clear by now: the togetherness that politicians touted after the Capitol riot is no longer. The idea that Republicans would’ve helped President Biden get his introductory bills passed was absurd in the first place. At this point, Democrats are looking for other ways to push their agenda through congress.

So, what exactly can Democrats do with their extremely slim trifecta? …


Despite the clear evidence of his insurrection of violence at the Capitol in early January, Donald Trump insists that his lawyers continue with the false allegation that the election was stolen from him. But why isn’t that enough to push his whole party away?

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On January 6th, it seemed that the president’s intents of overturning the election had met sufficient backlash; after the riot, a number of Republicans came out against the president in a brief flirtation of hope for many Democrats. …


Donald Trump’s history with the Republican Party is mixed: after receiving unflattering reviews during the primary, most Republicans did his bidding throughout his four years in office. However, amid rumors of Republican division, the question of his future in the GOP still remains uncertain.

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According to recent polling data from the Pew Research Center, Donald Trump’s popularity has taken a hit since the riots at the Capitol: 68% of Americans do not want him to remain a significant political figure. But Republicans and Democrats are still vastly divided.

Among Republicans and Republican-leaners, 46% believed that Trump held no responsibility for…


It seems so long ago that a large portion of the country was obsessing over two Senate runoff races in Georgia that would determine control of Congress during Joe Biden’s first two years. But there are certainly things that both Democrats and Republicans can learn from the races.

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Georgia is a Purple State.

In 2016, Hillary Clinton supposedly stood a chance in states like Arizona, Iowa, or even Texas that came, in large part, with large margins for Republican victories. At the time, because of changing demographics within the United States, some debated whether we would ever see another Republican president again. …


As we look towards the runoff election and inevitably glue ourselves to the election returns on Tuesday, I think it’s important to note how far the Democratic party has come.

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Last year saw one of the worst crises to come across the United States, made worse by inadequate leadership across the aisle and a dire situation that went unaddressed by half the country. Throughout the past decade or so, our country has polarized further and further, driving cooperation and consensus to the bottom of our legislative agenda and limiting the efficacy of American government altogether.

However, as we head into a new presidential term with a new presidential administration, hopefully focused on unifying an utterly divided country, we must note that there’s a reason that Democrats have been able to…


When Donald Trump ascended to the presidency, he vowed to become the dealmaker-in-chief and to cut through all of the bureaucracy to actually get things done. The problem is that that’s the one thing he’s currently failing to do.

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Since November 3rd, Donald Trump has spent the majority of his time categorically denying his loss in the presidential election, despite the Electoral College, the Supreme Court, and several million Americans all voting against him. But as the coronavirus pandemic gets worse and worse and a new virus pops up in the United Kingdom, Trump fails to do the one thing he’s tasked with for the next thirty or so days: be the president.

Although the number of tweets coming from the president’s account has almost certainly increased, he hasn’t been seen in public for a while, meaning he hasn’t…


The president has made it clear that he will never accept the results of this November’s election. After losing by a historic margin, his supporters will now have to wait another four years for another opportunity to reclaim the White House. But that doesn’t mean that this year’s election drama is over.

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Donald Trump’s campaign, led by Rudy Giuliani and his slate of lawyers, have unsuccessfully brought case after case to state courts in Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, Arizona, and Wisconsin, all with false hope of overturning the election results in those states. …


Over the past thirty years, Democrats have won the popular vote seven of eight times. But that’s worrying. Despite carrying historic margins, Democrats will enter the new year with less seats and legislatures. Why?

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In last month’s election, Joe Biden carried over eighty-one million votes, the most votes for any winning candidate in the history of the United States. That’s a huge victory for Democrats across the country.

Down the ballot, though, it’s a completely different story. Although Democrats have carried healthy margins nationally, there’s a sizable gap between their national support and level of political power. They’ve lost a number of seats in the House and are likely to remain the minority in the Senate.

And it’s not exactly their fault. Since the last presidential election, Republicans haven’t carried the national vote at…

Yash Rajpal

Teen writer. Plain and simple.

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